Notational

What our leaders and their intellectual lackeys seem incapable of understanding is that history cannot be swept clean like a blackboard, clean so that “we” might inscribe our own future there and impose our own forms of life for these lesser people to follow.

It is quite common to hear high officials in Washington and elsewhere speak of changing the map of the Middle East, as if ancient societies and myriad peoples can be shaken up like so many peanuts in a jar. But this has often happened with the “Orient,” that semi-mythical construct which since Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt in the late eighteenth century has been made and re-made countless times by power acting through an expedient form of knowledge to assert that this is the Orient’s nature, and we must deal with it accordingly.

In the process the uncountable sediments of history, which include innumerable histories and a dizzying variety of peoples, languages, experiences and cultures, all these are swept aside or ignored, relegated to the sand heap along with the treasures ground into meaningless fragments that were taken out of Baghdad’s libraries and museums.

My argument is that history is made by men and women, just as it can also be unmade and re-written, always with various silences and elisions, always with shapes imposed and disfigurements tolerated, so that “our” East, “our” Orient becomes “ours” to possess and direct.

Edward Said, Preface to Orientalism (2003 edition)

(Source: medievalpoc)


prostheticknowledge:


Raspberry Eye
Wearable computing device by genericsoma uses cheap materials and a Raspberry Pi computer - video embedded below:


I wanted to do something interesting with my RPi and a 2.4” TFT LCD. Google Glass was hot in the news, so I’ve decided to hack something similar. The semi-transparent mirror was extracted from Eye of Horus Beamsplitter, and the projection lens is cut from a plastic 3x Fresnel magnifying lens. The box and mounting parts are 3D-printed from ABS. Head strap is for GoPro. One RPi USB port is used for WiFi, and second for 2.4Ghz small wireless keyboard/mouse combo. All together cost around 100$.

This is the first version which has basic functionality, but hopes to include more features such as voice recognition and augmented reality.
You can find out more at the project’s webpage here
prostheticknowledge:


Raspberry Eye
Wearable computing device by genericsoma uses cheap materials and a Raspberry Pi computer - video embedded below:


I wanted to do something interesting with my RPi and a 2.4” TFT LCD. Google Glass was hot in the news, so I’ve decided to hack something similar. The semi-transparent mirror was extracted from Eye of Horus Beamsplitter, and the projection lens is cut from a plastic 3x Fresnel magnifying lens. The box and mounting parts are 3D-printed from ABS. Head strap is for GoPro. One RPi USB port is used for WiFi, and second for 2.4Ghz small wireless keyboard/mouse combo. All together cost around 100$.

This is the first version which has basic functionality, but hopes to include more features such as voice recognition and augmented reality.
You can find out more at the project’s webpage here
prostheticknowledge:


Raspberry Eye
Wearable computing device by genericsoma uses cheap materials and a Raspberry Pi computer - video embedded below:


I wanted to do something interesting with my RPi and a 2.4” TFT LCD. Google Glass was hot in the news, so I’ve decided to hack something similar. The semi-transparent mirror was extracted from Eye of Horus Beamsplitter, and the projection lens is cut from a plastic 3x Fresnel magnifying lens. The box and mounting parts are 3D-printed from ABS. Head strap is for GoPro. One RPi USB port is used for WiFi, and second for 2.4Ghz small wireless keyboard/mouse combo. All together cost around 100$.

This is the first version which has basic functionality, but hopes to include more features such as voice recognition and augmented reality.
You can find out more at the project’s webpage here
prostheticknowledge:


Raspberry Eye
Wearable computing device by genericsoma uses cheap materials and a Raspberry Pi computer - video embedded below:


I wanted to do something interesting with my RPi and a 2.4” TFT LCD. Google Glass was hot in the news, so I’ve decided to hack something similar. The semi-transparent mirror was extracted from Eye of Horus Beamsplitter, and the projection lens is cut from a plastic 3x Fresnel magnifying lens. The box and mounting parts are 3D-printed from ABS. Head strap is for GoPro. One RPi USB port is used for WiFi, and second for 2.4Ghz small wireless keyboard/mouse combo. All together cost around 100$.

This is the first version which has basic functionality, but hopes to include more features such as voice recognition and augmented reality.
You can find out more at the project’s webpage here
prostheticknowledge:


Raspberry Eye
Wearable computing device by genericsoma uses cheap materials and a Raspberry Pi computer - video embedded below:


I wanted to do something interesting with my RPi and a 2.4” TFT LCD. Google Glass was hot in the news, so I’ve decided to hack something similar. The semi-transparent mirror was extracted from Eye of Horus Beamsplitter, and the projection lens is cut from a plastic 3x Fresnel magnifying lens. The box and mounting parts are 3D-printed from ABS. Head strap is for GoPro. One RPi USB port is used for WiFi, and second for 2.4Ghz small wireless keyboard/mouse combo. All together cost around 100$.

This is the first version which has basic functionality, but hopes to include more features such as voice recognition and augmented reality.
You can find out more at the project’s webpage here

prostheticknowledge:

Raspberry Eye

Wearable computing device by genericsoma uses cheap materials and a Raspberry Pi computer - video embedded below:

I wanted to do something interesting with my RPi and a 2.4” TFT LCD. Google Glass was hot in the news, so I’ve decided to hack something similar. The semi-transparent mirror was extracted from Eye of Horus Beamsplitter, and the projection lens is cut from a plastic 3x Fresnel magnifying lens. The box and mounting parts are 3D-printed from ABS. Head strap is for GoPro. One RPi USB port is used for WiFi, and second for 2.4Ghz small wireless keyboard/mouse combo. All together cost around 100$.

This is the first version which has basic functionality, but hopes to include more features such as voice recognition and augmented reality.

You can find out more at the project’s webpage here


prostheticknowledge:

Newly Discovered Warhol Artworks Found On Amiga Floppy Disks From 1985
From The Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry:

A multi-institutional team of new-media artists, computer experts, and museum professionals have discovered a dozen previously unknown experiments by Andy Warhol (BFA, 1949) on aging floppy disks from 1985.
The purely digital images, “trapped” for nearly 30 years on Amiga® floppy disks stored in the archives collection of The Andy Warhol Museum (AWM), were discovered and extracted by members of the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Computer Club, with assistance from the AWM’s staff, CMU’s Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry (FRSCI), the Hillman Photography Initiative at the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA), and New York based artist Cory Arcangel.

More Here
It’s kinda funny to be presented with the news of new works by established artist from a digital medium, but then again it is well known that Warhol loved working with the Commodore Amiga - some links below:
A video showing Warhol using the Amiga to create a piece live before an audience with Debbie Harry [Link] [NME Front Cover] [The Finished Work]
An interview with Amiga World on working with the computer [Here and Here]

The top image of these three still holds up very well in my opinion. Fits right in with plenty of “new media” works I see these days.prostheticknowledge:

Newly Discovered Warhol Artworks Found On Amiga Floppy Disks From 1985
From The Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry:

A multi-institutional team of new-media artists, computer experts, and museum professionals have discovered a dozen previously unknown experiments by Andy Warhol (BFA, 1949) on aging floppy disks from 1985.
The purely digital images, “trapped” for nearly 30 years on Amiga® floppy disks stored in the archives collection of The Andy Warhol Museum (AWM), were discovered and extracted by members of the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Computer Club, with assistance from the AWM’s staff, CMU’s Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry (FRSCI), the Hillman Photography Initiative at the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA), and New York based artist Cory Arcangel.

More Here
It’s kinda funny to be presented with the news of new works by established artist from a digital medium, but then again it is well known that Warhol loved working with the Commodore Amiga - some links below:
A video showing Warhol using the Amiga to create a piece live before an audience with Debbie Harry [Link] [NME Front Cover] [The Finished Work]
An interview with Amiga World on working with the computer [Here and Here]

The top image of these three still holds up very well in my opinion. Fits right in with plenty of “new media” works I see these days.prostheticknowledge:

Newly Discovered Warhol Artworks Found On Amiga Floppy Disks From 1985
From The Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry:

A multi-institutional team of new-media artists, computer experts, and museum professionals have discovered a dozen previously unknown experiments by Andy Warhol (BFA, 1949) on aging floppy disks from 1985.
The purely digital images, “trapped” for nearly 30 years on Amiga® floppy disks stored in the archives collection of The Andy Warhol Museum (AWM), were discovered and extracted by members of the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Computer Club, with assistance from the AWM’s staff, CMU’s Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry (FRSCI), the Hillman Photography Initiative at the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA), and New York based artist Cory Arcangel.

More Here
It’s kinda funny to be presented with the news of new works by established artist from a digital medium, but then again it is well known that Warhol loved working with the Commodore Amiga - some links below:
A video showing Warhol using the Amiga to create a piece live before an audience with Debbie Harry [Link] [NME Front Cover] [The Finished Work]
An interview with Amiga World on working with the computer [Here and Here]

The top image of these three still holds up very well in my opinion. Fits right in with plenty of “new media” works I see these days.

prostheticknowledge:

Newly Discovered Warhol Artworks Found On Amiga Floppy Disks From 1985

From The Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry:

A multi-institutional team of new-media artists, computer experts, and museum professionals have discovered a dozen previously unknown experiments by Andy Warhol (BFA, 1949) on aging floppy disks from 1985.

The purely digital images, “trapped” for nearly 30 years on Amiga® floppy disks stored in the archives collection of The Andy Warhol Museum (AWM), were discovered and extracted by members of the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Computer Club, with assistance from the AWM’s staff, CMU’s Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry (FRSCI), the Hillman Photography Initiative at the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA), and New York based artist Cory Arcangel.

More Here

It’s kinda funny to be presented with the news of new works by established artist from a digital medium, but then again it is well known that Warhol loved working with the Commodore Amiga - some links below:

A video showing Warhol using the Amiga to create a piece live before an audience with Debbie Harry [Link] [NME Front Cover] [The Finished Work]

An interview with Amiga World on working with the computer [Here and Here]

The top image of these three still holds up very well in my opinion. Fits right in with plenty of “new media” works I see these days.


Streets are the dwelling place of the collective. The collective is an eternally unquiet, eternally agitated being that - in the space between the building fronts - experiences, learns, understands, and invents as much as individuals do within the privacy of their own four walls. For this collective, glossy enameled shop signs are a wall decoration as good as, if not better than, an oil painting in the drawing room of a bourgeois; walls with their “Post No Bills” are its writing desk, newspaper stands its libraries, mailboxes its bronze busts, benches its bedroom furniture, and the café terrace is the balcony from which it looks down on its household. The section of railing where road workers hang their jackets is the vestibule, and the gateway which leads from the row of courtyards out into the open is the long corridor that daunts the bourgeois, being for the courtyards the entry to the chambers of the city. Among these latter, the arcade was the drawing room. More than anywhere else, the street reveals itself in the arcade as the furnished and familiar interior of the masses.

— BENJAMIN, Walter. The Arcade Project. [M3a,4] (via flaneurismo)